Thinking about declawing your kitty?



Did you know …. declawing is already banned in the following countries:












Northern Ireland










New Zealand


The United States has yet to join this list however, New York is working on becoming the first US state to outlaw declawing cats.

It’s already illegal in Los Angeles and some other California cities.


Unlike human nails, a cat’s claws are attached to bone, so declawing a feline requires a veterinarian to slice through tendon and nerves to remove the last segment of bone in a cat’s toes.

Some of the felines who have the procedure resort to biting and some avoid using the litter box.

Understand the truth about why you should NOT declaw…

-If performed on a human being, declawing would be like cutting off each finger at the last knuckle.

-Cats scratch to exercise and enjoy themselves, maintain the condition of their nails, and stretch their muscles.

-While we hope that your cat remains safely indoors at all times, if he or she were ever to get outside without claws, your cat would be far more vulnerable to predators and abusers.

-Many people think that declawed cats are safer around babies, but in fact, the lack of claws makes many cats feel so insecure that they tend to bite more often as a means of self-protection.

-Cats are in pain when they awake from the surgery, and the pain continues afterward. Nails can grow back inside the paw, causing extreme pain that you can’t see.

-Without claws, even house-trained cats might start “doing their business” outside the litterbox in an attempt to mark their territory or because they associate using their litter box with pain.

-Our toes are crucial to our balance, and it’s no different for cats! Because of impaired balance after the procedure, declawed cats have to relearn how to walk, much as a person would after losing his or her toes.

What you can do instead:

-Trim your cat’s nails regularly. When the cat is relaxed and unafraid, gently press on his or her toes until the claws extend. Use a pair of nail clippers, and cut only the tip of the nail, taking care not to damage the vein, or “quick.” The nail hook (sharp tip) is what tears upholstery, so keeping them trimmed virtually eliminates the potential for damage.


-Buy multiple scratching posts. Ideally, you should have two or more scratching posts in your home. Make sure that they’re sturdy and tall enough to allow your cat to stretch (3 feet or taller). Soft, fluffy carpeted posts won’t fulfill your cat’s clawing needs, so look for rougher posts. We suggest a sturdy ROPE post.


-Teach your cat where to scratch and where not to scratch. Encourage your cat to use the scratching posts by sprinkling catnip on the posts once a week. Discourage your cat from scratching furniture by using a loud, firm voice whenever he or she starts to scratch—cats don’t like loud noises! Never use physical force. Instead, you might try using a squirt gun full of lukewarm water directed at your cat’s back.


-Ask your veterinarian about soft plastic caps (like Soft Paws®) that are glued to the cat’s nails. These are not permanent and would need to be replaced about every six weeks.


-Attach a special tape (like Sticky Paws®) to furniture to deter your cat from unwanted scratching.



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